Zoom Logo

REGP_GODORT Annual Virtual Meetings (June 14 - 17) - Shared screen with speaker view
Aimee Quinn
24:27
Please use my gmail address Michael.
Samantha Hager - support
25:44
Here is Lynda's email address: lmk277@cornell.edu
Jenny Groome
26:32
I can't tell if it is my connection - sound drops out but comes back quickly
Samantha Hager - support
27:15
I think it may be your connection.
Jenny Groome
27:37
Michael - remember when we talked about items being stolen? There are some rare items in federal documents
Michael Alguire
29:04
Jenny--Thanks for the info.
Abigail McDermott
30:08
Some of the shared print programs also have defined "at-risk" in their attempts to prioritize titles for registry in those efforts.
Jenny Groome
33:15
I was asked to write up a summary of a GovDoc-L discussion on Serial Set Gems (for FDLP?) I didn't because it was too hard to protect items. I started to write about how it is hard to learn about rare documents when new to gov docs. Steps we take to protect items also keeps new gov info librarians from learning about them
Kristina Bobe
34:22
Jenny, can you explain? Were you afraid of bringing attention to certain volumes for fear of them being targeted?
Jenny Groome
34:47
I ran into state documents that were in public domain, but illustrations were copyrighted by the contracted artist.
Aimee Quinn
35:57
Kristina, the packet I just discussed recommends not to publish a list of items because they do become a target list. It is better to discuss them with a colleague over coffee or something like that.
Cynthia Etkin
36:03
+1 Jenny
Aimee Quinn
36:22
+2 Jenny
Jenny Groome
36:27
Kristina - yes ., It was a few years ago. People asked me to not list certain items that have been targeted in the past. So I thought an article about how to learn the titles - rather than list the actual documents.
Kristina Bobe
36:31
Yes, that often gets mentioned about the Serial Set.
Susanne Caro
37:30
I wish we had more room in our rare collection to move more materials- but we have to be selective due to room.
Jenny Groome
39:37
@Susanne - constant problem
Susanne Caro
39:48
I think that is what is being worked on- characteristics of rare materials- age, images, images in color, map, subject matter....
Katie Little
40:26
Once Aimee is finished, I will click on you, @Abigail
Jenny Groome
42:39
There are some rare, valuable documents in Interior 1880s Dept of Education series. $200 in 2002 for a small pamphlet on school furniture. I made the special collection take entire series (1/3 of a shelf)
John Beekman
45:38
digitization = access. digitization does not equal preservation
Kristina Bobe
45:51
+1 John
Aimee Quinn
46:06
Agreed John
Kris Abery
46:14
+2 John
John Beekman
47:12
"born digital" material is the most at risk of all!
Susanne Caro
47:38
What do we do about data, or is that a can of worms we don't want to touch? I'm thinking of some of the content that was not distributed but was available on agency sites or places like Data.gov and are no longer accessible.
Michael Alguire
47:41
Agreed John!
Cynthia Etkin
47:53
+1 John
Jenny Groome
48:13
Something people don't often think about - general public pamphlets are useful for court cases to show what was generally accepted knowledge - ex. about lead paint, radon, etc. Regionals don't have to keep superseded pamphlets, and then old pamphlets can be lost. I speak from experience of withdrawing a pamphlet that courts knew was in my selective but not State Library/Regional. And it didn't have to go through discard procedure because it was superseded
Jenny Groome
49:07
1yes to John and Susanne
John Beekman
49:23
I'm going to keep that point in mind when weeding (which I don't do a lot of)
Kristina Bobe
50:00
Jenny, what an interesting comment about superseded documents. It goes against what a lot of people have been thinking as far as their long-term use or relevance.
Aimee Quinn
50:00
And all those early CDs which do not run anymoe
Jenny Groome
50:38
Yes - Kristina - I learned the hard way at a previous library
John Beekman
51:01
I'm a newbie here but IPUMS does work with legacy data
Katie Little
51:09
Yes, the software is an issue.
Susanne Caro
51:25
1980s Census computer reels. :(
Katie Little
51:29
John, what is IPUMS?
Jenny Groome
51:41
And hardware - remember to get a cd/dvd drive when your office computer is updated
John Beekman
52:44
"Over the past 25 years, IPUMS has received 70 federal grants and contracts totaling over $140 million to curate, integrate, and disseminate government-produced data collections." https://ipums.org/mission-purpose
John Beekman
52:52
census data, mostly
Katie Little
53:03
Thank you, John
Susanne Caro
53:49
PDF-A is the archival version
Katie Little
54:54
Thank you, Susanne. I have used a PDF-A, not much, but have done so in data recovery.
Jenny Groome
55:51
data.census.gov does want feedback from users. They didn't think PDF or statistic charts were important. They though people always wanted most current data. So, the more people who let them know, the more likely we'll get historic data saved in data.census.gov
Kristina Bobe
56:51
http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/
Cynthia Etkin
56:53
http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/
Angela Bonnell
56:59
Thanks!
Susanne Caro
57:06
Something like this? https://digitalpowrr.niu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/UnivUtah_DigPresDecFlowchart.pdf
Kristina Bobe
57:17
Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative
Aimee Quinn
58:22
I think a flow chart will work really well with digital materials and will be a good addition for at risk, especially since preserving digital materials is different from tangible.
Aimee Quinn
58:48
Same goes with preserving data
Aimee Quinn
59:20
PARS has some good guidelines to use as well
Aimee Quinn
01:00:05
What a fun job, Cindy!
Kathy Stroud
01:00:41
The Docker system is a possabiiity for storing operating system/software environment along with program/data
Susanne Caro
01:00:57
Please include microcards!
Cynthia Etkin
01:01:29
Thanks Susanne for mentioning microcard!
Jenny Groome
01:01:33
Are institutions' IT departments concerned about security using older software and/or OS?
Aimee Quinn
01:01:37
+1 Susanne
Jenny Groome
01:02:32
+yes Susanne!
Kris Abery
01:02:32
Very true Susanne
Kristina Bobe
01:02:40
Were microcards distributed from GPO, or only from private vendors? If so, you run into proprietary issues.
Kathy Stroud
01:02:43
My systems department doesn't think Docs Librarians need a DVD drive.
Jenny Groome
01:03:00
@Kathy = Oh No!
Susanne Caro
01:03:22
Kathy- or the ability to open a zip file
Kristina Bobe
01:03:33
I've only seen Readex. thanks Aimee!
John Beekman
01:03:34
I think Jersey City Library still gets some fiche.
John Beekman
01:04:03
I deal with state and city docs, I'm not the Fed Docs person
Cynthia Etkin
01:04:11
Aimee, my former institution had microcards
Kristina Bobe
01:04:34
Microscopic images on cards. You needed a special machine to enlarge the text and view them. They 'saved space'.
Katie Little
01:04:48
Thank you!
Susanne Caro
01:05:01
UN pubs were available on microcards
Kristina Bobe
01:05:42
Stereo-opticon as on early 3D technology?
Kristina Bobe
01:06:26
at some period in time, microcards must have seemed like 'the future'
Angela Bonnell
01:07:53
stereopticon … yes … like 3-D, like a Viewmaster
Kristina Bobe
01:08:06
That sounds amazing
Angela Bonnell
01:09:51
@Kristina ...Yes very interesting! :)
Susanne Caro
01:10:05
microcard reader\
Susanne Caro
01:10:51
I'm not sure those are made anymore
Jenny Groome
01:10:51
I think that people have said it would help if GPO helped migrate formats
Aimee Quinn
01:10:59
New microform reader/scanners can read microcars and aperture cards
Kristina Bobe
01:11:08
I imagine that rare and at-risk discussion and definition includes content that can only be accessed through obsolete or soon to be obsolete equipment? Microcards, floppy disks, laser discs, etc. Also a priority for preservation and digitization...
Katie Little
01:11:25
Very interesting, Aimee.
Katie Little
01:11:40
Good point, Kristina
Jenny Groome
01:12:47
"forensic" level computers are expensive and I think might require FBI training or something. CT State Archives has such a computer, but I don't know anything about it other than it can handle lots of formats
John Beekman
01:12:48
I think that Internet Archive (& their Community Webs program) is building readability migration into the web archiving process. I know that the issue is part of the discussion of the web archiving stanbdard.
Jenny Groome
01:13:44
@John - that sounds interesting
Michael Alguire
01:14:38
@John--thanks for info. Glad it's being considered as part of the web archiving standard.
Abigail McDermott
01:15:04
https://www.govinfo.gov/
Jenny Groome
01:15:06
Any motion on reducing the volume holdings require for all-digital FDLP library?
Kathy Stroud
01:15:13
Some Universities have digital repositories which work with specific types of data. There's some that are maintaining their local or state government.
Kathy Stroud
01:15:25
Also, is it all one central cerver?
Kristina Bobe
01:15:32
GPO also does not have the content onsite, so we coordinate with FDLP libraries to acquire content and digitize
Aimee Quinn
01:15:36
If you are interested in looking at a new microforms reader/scanner, look at Integra ScanPro. Several libraries in WA state purchased these
Kristina Bobe
01:16:10
https://libguides.fdlp.gov/GPODigitization
Kathy Stroud
01:16:20
One central server can be problematic. Is the Lockss still active?
Cynthia Etkin
01:16:54
Yes, LOCKSSUS DOCS is still active
Jenny Groome
01:17:03
Isn't LOCKSS for FDLP at free gov info website?
Samantha Hager - support
01:17:24
https://www.lockss.org/
Samantha Hager - support
01:17:34
Lots of copies keep stuff safe
Susanne Caro
01:17:46
Does anyone remember the university that was migrating floppy disks?
Samantha Hager - support
01:17:59
I think it was Indiana University
Jenny Groome
01:17:59
Kathy - that was me 10 years ago, trying to figure out what happened between 2005 & 2010
Cynthia Etkin
01:18:04
SUsanne, Indiana State
Jenny Groome
01:18:19
Sorry , I can't hear.
Susanne Caro
01:18:30
Thanks! http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/virtual_disk_library/index.cgi/
Jenny Groome
01:19:33
Is Indiana the one that had loaded the cds onto a website?
Cynthia Etkin
01:19:47
Floppy Disk Project Making publications that were distributed to federal depository libraries on floppy disk available over the Internet. Indiana University-Bloomington Libraries
Jenny Groome
01:20:19
Thanks - that was so useful
Jenny Groome
01:26:37
thanks for letting me add to your committee. my connection is like a yo-yo, so I'll say good bye - see you tomorrow
Aimee Quinn
01:27:17
Bye Jenny!
Susanne Caro
01:27:29
How about a chat or webinar on obsolete/ endangered formats?
Kristina Bobe
01:27:41
Sounds interesting!
Michael Alguire
01:30:35
This article includes Vincent Cerf saying physical copies of documents/data since formats will change: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/13/google-boss-warns-forgotten-century-email-photos-vint-cerf
Samantha Hager - support
01:31:13
If you put your email in the chat, I can send you a copy
Michael Alguire
01:31:24
Key excerpt: "Humanity’s first steps into the digital world could be lost to future historians, Vint Cerf told the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting in San Jose, California, warning that we faced a “forgotten generation, or even a forgotten century” through what he called “bit rot”, where old computer files become useless junk.Cerf called for the development of “digital vellum” to preserve old software and hardware so that out-of-date files could be recovered no matter how old they are.“When you think about the quantity of documentation from our daily lives that is captured in digital form, like our interactions by email, people’s tweets, and all of the world wide web, it’s clear that we stand to lose an awful lot of our history,” he said.“We don’t want our digital lives to fade away. If we want to preserve them, we need to make sure that the digital objects we create today can still be rendered far into the future,” he added."
Samantha Hager - support
01:31:59
or you can email me directly at hager_s@cde.state.co.us
John Beekman
01:32:01
I tell people I'm more likely to find a NJ gov doc from 1910 than I am 2010.
Angela Bonnell
01:32:20
+1 John
Susanne Caro
01:32:57
+1 John
Kristina Bobe
01:33:04
lol John
Aimee Quinn
01:33:12
+3 John
Kristina Bobe
01:35:32
People do think that everything is on the internet, unfortunately
Kathy Stroud
01:35:49
yes!
John Beekman
01:36:03
photos of dinosaurs
Aimee Quinn
01:36:21
Absolutely! I also find they are surprised when it is available digitally as well.
Kathy Stroud
01:36:31
aerial photography from the mid-1800s was my best request
Jennifer Castle
01:36:51
It’s in Kentucky.
Aimee Quinn
01:36:51
Yes there is
Aimee Quinn
01:37:38
Nice Kathy!
Susanne Caro
01:38:36
do you need volunteers for anything?
Katie Little
01:39:10
We can always use volunteers, Susan. Our committee has been small.
Aimee Quinn
01:42:00
I have to go to another meeting. Nice chatting with you all.
Katie Little
01:42:13
Yes, very nice. Thank you for your input
John Beekman
01:43:44
I depository libraries, or digitized?
Kristina Bobe
01:45:21
Private vendors have digitized public domain docs, but then charge for access to public domain (copyright free) content. Federal Government is still catching up. We do not have the same business model (charging for access).
Susanne Caro
01:48:15
Kristina- and I can't afford most of them. :(
Susanne Caro
01:51:18
Ancestry also tried to copyright people's DNA, that made folks uncomfortable.
John Beekman
01:51:37
Great meeting - I have jump off to close up shop.
Kristina Bobe
01:51:59
Federal agencies do have digitization initiatives, thank goodness. LOC has major initiatives. Discussion for another day!
Susanne Caro
01:52:14
Good discussion! thank you!
Kristina Bobe
01:52:24
thanks Katie! thanks all and good to 'see' you
Angela Bonnell
01:52:34
Yes! Great discussion!
Jennifer Castle
01:52:46
Thank you!
Katie Little
01:52:59
Yes, thank you so much! PLease join us again
Angela Bonnell
01:53:07
Thanks, Katie, for running the meeting!
Angela Bonnell
01:53:15
Thanks, Cynthia, for leading the project!
Michael Alguire
01:53:18
Great discussion everyone!
Cynthia Etkin
01:54:43
Thanks to Angie and Katie!