Zoom Logo

GODORT 2021 Midwinter Meeting: Writers Panel - Shared screen with speaker view
Susanne Caro
43:34
Do you have a question for the panelists? Put it in the chat!
Kelly Wilson
50:18
I have one for Chris -- Are there any specific recording apps that you can recommend?
Kim MacVaugh
51:38
For anyone: Do you have any tips for “getting your feet wet” or first steps for your first research/publication as a brand new academic librarian who doesn’t know where to start
Chris Brown
53:23
I use an iPhone app called VoiceRecorder from TapMedia Ltd. Very simple.
Lynda Kellam
53:57
A great place to get your feet wet are these publications like Baseline and DttP
Lynda Kellam
54:57
They are good starting points typically because the editors will work with you.
Kim MacVaugh
56:38
Thanks Lynda
Lynda Kellam
01:00:48
Also collaborating with others (like they have mentioned) sometimes takes the pressure off. Especially if they are seasoned authors. :)
Dominique Hallett
01:10:25
Yes, it is that same feeling being a contributor. Tom was a great editor and did lots of hand holding through the process
Tom Diamond
01:12:12
Thanks Dominique! Good to work with you, too.
Aimee Quinn
01:12:19
I love the columns and articles. I learn so much from them.
Kelly Wilson
01:12:32
This was an amazing presentation!!!
Susanne Caro
01:13:33
Where do you get ideas for what to write about?
Dominique Hallett
01:14:22
I love that article - oranges and peaches is great
Aimee Quinn
01:14:35
+1 Dominique
Aimee Quinn
01:15:59
Lori, it is similar to someone asking for Taco Bell score when they wanted Pachelbel's Canon. Plus I have to agree with book and web site reviews as a great way to start!
Dominique Hallett
01:16:05
Dewdney, P., & Michell, G. (1996). Oranges and Peaches: Understanding Communication Accidents in the Reference Interview. RQ, 35(4), 520-536. Retrieved January 14, 2021, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20862995
Kim MacVaugh
01:16:12
Thank you Lorri, that’s super helpful! I really appreciate it
Susanne Caro
01:17:06
A list of resources and example publications and a recording of this presentation will be available on the GODORT Midwinter page
Lauren DuBois (she/her)
01:17:37
thank you Susanne! That list is what I'm itching for :) Great presentation
Kim MacVaugh
01:17:43
And you too Laura and Chris :) Great advice to find a mentor
Kelly Wilson
01:19:49
Q for Everyone: If your work does not allow time for you to work on research, how do you find a good work / life balance when working on writing?
Aimee Quinn
01:22:20
One thing I find which helps me is to set bench marks for myself. Also, I suggest writing everyday. I write for at least a half hour - much of it, I toss, but I frequently am able to incorporate into columns, blogs, reviews, articles, and/or book chapters. etc.
Aimee Quinn
01:23:03
John, that was a wonderful column!
Chris Brown
01:23:19
I agree with Aimee. Write something every day, even if it is just a paragraph.
Kelly Wilson
01:24:58
Great advice, thank you!
Kelly Wilson
01:25:58
Wonderful panel, thank you all!
Aimee Quinn
01:26:02
Lorri is exactly right. I have had positions do not allow time for scholarship. I block 8-9 am for writing. I officially start my day at 9 am.
Lisa Pritchard
01:26:03
Thank you so much. Such an accomplished group and really good tips.
Patricia Kenly
01:26:17
Yes, wonderful!! Thank you all so much.
Jennifer Castle
01:26:24
Thank you very much!
Aimee Quinn
01:26:32
Fabulous panel everyone! Thank you!
Hallie Pritchett
01:26:33
­Thanks everyone!
Kim MacVaugh
01:26:33
Thank you all, it was super practical and helpful!
Natalia Estrada (she/they)
01:26:34
Thank you for this wonderful session!