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Library Facilities and Interiors Interest Group (Core IG Week) - Shared screen with speaker view
Brooke Morris-Chott, Advocacy & EDI Program Officer (she/her)
12:08
Just a quick note that our Code of Conduct can be found at http://www.ala.org/core/about/statement-of-conduct . Please contact me through private chat or at bmorris@ala.org if you experience or see any violations of the Code.
Pattie Piotrowski
18:30
No cleaning, just quarantine.
Joann Simone
18:47
4 day quarantine
Rose Knight
19:07
We are following REALM guidelines
Maria De La Torre-Lomeli
19:18
7 days quarantine and clean the materials
Amy Nuttall
19:20
The smaller library I worked at last year cleaned books, but I'm in a bigger system now and we just quarantine materials for 7 days
Tom Bruno
19:26
3 days quarantine for returns at University of Pennsylvania, no cleaning
Jeromy Horkman
19:26
We also set aside for 4+ days as per REALM guidelines.
Tim Klassen
19:53
3 day quarantine, but we are reconsidering as our local public library system is proposing no longer quarenting due to newer scientific evidence
Anne Cooper Moore
19:54
We set aside materials for at least 3 days. The machines don't work.
Lloyd Jansen
20:12
48 hr. quarantine of materials. No other cleaning/disinfecting. Time period was recommended by the Maryland Dept. of Health after reviewing the REALM study results.
Cindy Pierard
20:13
We are doing what Anne is doing: 72 hours
Katherine Dabbour
20:38
Cal State Univ Northridge—we are quarantining materials as per REALM guidelines, circulating via mail, soon using outdoor lockers.
Katie McDonough-DE Div of Libraries
21:21
https://www.timesleaderonline.com/news/local-news/2020/09/bellaire-library-using-ultraviolet-light-machine-to-sanitize-books/
Patricia Husband
21:28
EBRPL is quarantining returned materials for four days.
Anne Cooper Moore
21:46
We are open as an academic library and now admit the public as well. We retrieve for quick pickup, will put them on a table for pickup, and will mail.
Tom Bruno
23:20
George Washington University's Law Library said that they're using this UV device to sterilize books- they call it their "E-Z Bake Oven"! https://www.ristech.com/steri-book-book-sterilizer/
Anne Cooper Moore
24:01
We got an offsite storage facility and are moving 70% of our collection. We are renovating our study spaces for social distancing with electricity and movable furniture.\
Eric A. Kidwell
24:03
We're a primarily residential college. We had in-person classes in the fall (students did have a remote option) and plan the same for the spring. For the Library, we just completed phase 1 of a redesign project when COVID hit. Fortunately, this helped us in providing social distancing in the building. We've moved out a few chairs and laid out new traffic flows, but otherwise our operations have not changed re:COVID.
Pattie Piotrowski
26:53
UIS renovated in 2018 and that set us up in a good way to meet COVID. Computers no longer elbow to elbow but in a pinwheel shape about the column that holds electricity. Lots of mobile furniture and collections moved to storage.
Katherine Dabbour
29:25
We are in Los Angeles County and have been closed to users since March 31, 2020. We have installed plastic shields, hand sanitizer, socially distanced workstations and study tables, in preparation for re-opening our main floor learning commons to students only by appointment, by summer or fall 2021. We don’t anticipate being fully open until spring 2022. We already have a onsite automated storage system. We are doing books by mail and outdoor LuxerOne lockers in early March. No access to print reserves. Focusing on e-books for monographic acquisitions, using CARES funds to provide access to high use e-textbooks from BibliU. I am jealous of the renovation and new furnishings happening!
Patricia Husband
30:09
We've been using more vinly for the past several years, primarily for durability, but it is also much easier to keep clean.
Amy Nuttall
31:57
We've put all our seating in storage to encourage people not to congregate or linger, so we haven't had to worry about cleaning it
Anne Cooper Moore
35:07
We have 1 person for table regardless of size. In 4 part carrels, only two can be used.
Anne Cooper Moore
35:28
We surplused old furniture and stored some of it.
Pattie Piotrowski
37:54
Our proposal for a new building went out for bid last spring and we had dozens of responses, some expected some surprising. Firm chosen and in contract.
Tim Klassen
40:33
Do we have a discussion list for this group?
K.T. Vaughan
40:39
Also, it's time to volunteer for committees - so if you're interested in helping develop and assess those surveys, please put your name in for selection! http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/committees/jnt-buildres
Patricia Husband
41:11
We are open to the public, though we have slightly reduced our operating hours. We have moved some chairs off the public floors to allow for social distancing. We have limited the number of computers that are available to the public. The lower number of computers has been a little challenging for areas where computer use is significant. We are limiting use of our meeting rooms, but at this point we do not allow use of study rooms. We have plexiglass shields at service desks, and staff and patrons are required to wear masks. We provide cleaning and disinfecting supplies for our staff to use to clean workstations and patron computers. We have also contracted with a company to provide hand sanitizing stations at each of our locations. Our stacks are open to the public, though we have removed the board books from the children's areas. We quarantine most of our materials for four days, though we do quarantine magazines for seven days. We fog our buildings on a regular basis with a disinfectant.
Julie Wendorf
42:20
In Northwest Indiana there have been a number of public libraries that have had reno projects occurring during Covid. The biggest concern is working with contractors that are highly resistant to following Covid safety protocol. They refuse to mask. One question that is being discussed locally, mostly due to weather, is creating a drive up window to continue curbside service despite winter weather conditions.
Tim Klassen
43:56
thanks much!!
Anne Cooper Moore
44:52
Online services
Pattie Piotrowski
45:12
more online services, remote work
Jesus Campos
45:27
Virtual presence will continue though diminished after we come back to in-person interactions.
Lloyd Jansen
45:43
I think virtual meetings, telecommuting, curbside service, and online chat will continue into the future.
Pattie Piotrowski
46:12
Remote work will impact staff spaces
Anne Cooper Moore
46:29
We will only have staff in the building who need to be there, which will be advantageous for us because our offices are all over the academic library. We realized we are different from other campus services who have their offices separated from those they serve.
Amy Nuttall
47:00
Even after the pandemic, people will have gotten used to doing more things online/remotely, and some will want to continue that
Julie Wendorf
47:40
The library as a 3rd place may grow even more if there is a continued move for community members to WFH.
Tim Klassen
48:17
One of the things I'm hearing locally is a reversal in who want's to work from home, many staff are not nearly as enthused as they thought they would be, where-as the employer is more interested in this option now
Eric A. Kidwell
48:23
I cannot imagine my college administration allowing remote work on any permanent basis … they aren't allowing it now unless there is an exceptional need on the part of the employee.
Eric A. Kidwell
48:43
And I'm guarding our library space VERY closely.
K.T. Vaughan
49:22
I think we'll be able to get a telecommuting policy passed, but everyone says they want to come to the library because they miss the community of coworkers.
Pattie Piotrowski
49:56
Trust issues with WFH will be the next hurdle for administrators. Those who didn't work hard in the office are the same at home and true for those who are hard-working, wherever they work from.
Katherine Dabbour
50:21
Union contracts for library staff and faculty would have to be amended, but I could see telecommuting for some employees being a regular option.
Anne Cooper Moore
50:49
We are distributing a new telecommuting policy.
Lloyd Jansen
51:11
Our regional library in Southern Maryland hired a tech person who lives in Florida because he can do 99% of hi job remotely. It helped that he was a returning former staff person.
Julie Wendorf
51:17
Remote work in public libraries is very limited. So many of our staff have only in-person service duties. It causes a divide between staff when very few or only higher level staff can WFH.
Pattie Piotrowski
52:01
I hired a staff member who is in FL since August (I am in IL). It's been great!
Katherine Dabbour
52:22
Silver lining—focus more on e-reserves whenever possible because “2-hour in library use only” has always been hard for our students, most of whom work. We are only open extended hours the week before and during finals; otherwise, 80 hours per week.
Anne Cooper Moore
52:34
We are going for an LSTA grant to provide wifi hotspots and accounts for students who need them.
Pattie Piotrowski
52:40
Agree@Julie so maybe positions need to be written differently
K.T. Vaughan
52:51
Not all of my faculty/staff have a home computer or internet.
Pattie Piotrowski
53:24
KT - we used CARES funding to purchase devices and access for staff to WFH
K.T. Vaughan
53:49
My institution is not eligible for that.
K.T. Vaughan
53:58
(Or at least, we decided we weren't)
K.T. Vaughan
54:30
Some of them don't have internet not by choice. It's not available.
Marie Sorensen, RA
54:47
New government interest in wi-fi coverage disparity is likely because people can’t do their K-12 classes in person, and can’t comply with the legal requirement to go to school
Anne Cooper Moore
55:15
Yes, K-12 has really brought wifi access front and center.
Pattie Piotrowski
55:25
The biggest request while limiting access has been for group study. The library has a stronger presence than ever and COVID has helped us with that marketing.
Anne Cooper Moore
55:49
Students want to be together!
Pattie Piotrowski
55:50
Agree@Jesus!
Eric A. Kidwell
56:03
I wonder if we have not overestimated the appeal of e-books with students. Students at my college do not like e-books. They want print if they need more than a chapter.
Katherine Dabbour
56:16
Our library has been giving up space to offices and service points from depts. in academic affairs, and outside of the library’s purview. We have a coffee counter in the lobby and have a creative media studio and 3-d printer maker space.
Eric A. Kidwell
56:45
Agree @Anne … the library as a physical space, in my opinion, will remain important for students.
Marie Sorensen, RA
57:02
What will happen after Covid to interest in digital scholarship centers and maker spaces? Will these still be the types of spaces we’re interested in promoting as a library community? Or will there be other new types of spaces we will promote? What services and communities will those spaces provide and create?
Katherine Dabbour
57:09
Students need group study space and individual study spaces that have smart technology.
Charles Forrest
57:53
I think one thing we have seen the pandemic do is accelerate trends that were already underway (sometimes for many years)—online shopping, social media connectivity, remote work and remote access. The challenge will be to continue based on strength, and return to what we had before based on benefit.
Katherine Dabbour
58:29
Marie Sorenson, we were about to start our Reno project for a digital scholarship center when we closed and academic affairs took back the $1 million due to budget cuts. :-(
Katherine Dabbour
58:57
*reno* not Reno, although it’s a cool city!
Jesus Campos
59:40
We have added traditional reading rooms to every new library because students do want silent areas.
Pattie Piotrowski
59:49
UIS had a strong online presence before COVID so balancing ebooks for those programs, with those who prefer print is a constant challenge.
Marie Sorensen, RA
01:00:34
That’s so frustrating @Katherine Dabbour. I’m wondering if declining college population (the “demographic cliff”) will require re-thinking of the types and scale of projects we can promote.
Joann Simone
01:00:37
Thank you for this informative look at present and future interior space...
Tim Klassen
01:02:46
Also a challenge will be managing student expectations upon re-opening. Due to huge budget cuts we've closed two popular branches in past year and we have a smaller staff. Suspect many are going through such things!
Maria De La Torre-Lomeli
01:04:07
Thanks for all the information. It's great to hear what other library systems are doing.
Katherine Dabbour
01:04:10
@MarieSorensen oddly enough, we keep meeting our target enrollment, but we now get more transfer than freshmen students.
Anne Cooper Moore
01:04:19
Yes.
Anne Cooper Moore
01:04:27
Every 6 weeks?
Lora amsberryaugier
01:04:35
yes, quarterly
Katherine Dabbour
01:04:38
Yes, this is very helpful!
Patricia Husband
01:04:45
I would be interested. Every couple of months or quarterly.
Jesus Campos
01:04:45
Quarterly would be good.
Kabel Stanwicks
01:04:45
quarterly is helpful
Julie Wolfe
01:04:50
Quarterly
Jesus Campos
01:05:21
Organizing topics might be useful.
Marie Sorensen, RA
01:05:26
Quarterly is good
Katherine Dabbour
01:05:27
I like a set topic with time for open discussion.
Charles Forrest
01:05:29
I’m struck by the variety of experiences across a variety of libraries, and the variety of response. One of the trends we should pay attention to is grounding library service design in the needs of the community served.
Marie Sorensen, RA
01:05:36
Specific topic is great
Anne Cooper Moore
01:06:52
Thank you!
Marie Sorensen, RA
01:07:03
Thank you Dick and Gili for leading us
Katherine Dabbour
01:07:03
Thanks so much, this has been great!
Jesus Campos
01:07:03
Thank you all.
Lora amsberryaugier
01:07:04
thanks
Cindy Pierard
01:07:06
Thank you